ART: BOWIE / COLLECTOR

David Bowie’s Art Collection is up for grabs

A gallery assistant poses with

A gallery assistant poses with “Beautiful, Hallo, Space-Boy Painting” by Damien Hurst during the press preview of the “Bowie/Collector” auction at Sotheby’s. Leon Neal/Getty Images

Art has always been for me a stable nourishment,” said David Bowie.

On the occasion of Sotheby’s historic three-part sale of the legendary artist’s personal collection, his close friend and fellow musician Bono offers an appreciation. Plus, a sampling of Bowie’s own insightful words on the artists he admired and a selection of the works with which he lived. 

BONO, SEPTEMBER 2016 said: David understood the power of the image better than any musician who ever lived. He spent his life creating images, some of which he tried to occupy or personify, some of which he hung from his music and some his music hung from. He knew that in his time, more than any other era, ideas often arrived as pictures and that the world was being shaped by photography, cinematography and, even still, painting.

A painting by John Virtue called 'Landscape No. 87', part of the Bowie Collection on display at Sotheby's. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

A painting by John Virtue called ‘Landscape No. 87’, part of the Bowie Collection on display at Sotheby’s. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

BOWIE ON ART AND ARTISTS:

DAVID BOWIE was not just a collector of art, but also an informed authority on the subject. He was close to countless living artists and maintained conversations with them throughout his life. In 1994 he was invited to join the editorial board of Modern Painters magazine, to which he contributed in-depth interviews with the likes of Tracey Emin, Balthus and Damien Hirst, a review of the first-ever Johannesburg Biennale in 1995 and a response to the life and work of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Below is a selection of Bowie’s astute and deeply personal observations, first published in Modern Painters and The New York Times on the art and artists that fascinated and inspired him.

ON BALTHUS

Bowie suggested to the editors of Modern Painters that he might be able to secure an interview with the reclusive Balthus. Both men were living in Switzerland at the time and had met at a gallery opening for Balthus’s wife, Setsuko. One afternoon in the summer of 1994, Bowie drove to a mountain chalet in Rossinière to meet the painter, whose works of “timeless, serene, but disturbed sculptural claustrophobia” he greatly admired. Their conversation as well as Bowie’s introductory text are extraordinary. Sitting at lunch with the artist and Setsuko, he observed: “Balthus puts down his knife and fork and, staring at some far off point, says quietly:  ‘I awoke very early this morning. I went to my studio and started work. It would not come…. and I gazed at my painting then the small things around me and I felt such a tremendous…sense of awe.’” His voice dies away, leaving “a misty trail of remembrances, glories and maybe disappointments,” Bowie continued. “Locked in silence, we three sit, Balthus, Setsuko and I. The tragedy and chaos of the twentieth century rushes through the memory of its last Legendary Painter.”

ON MARCEL DUCHAMP

“Sometimes I wish that I could put myself in Duchamp’s place to feel what he felt when he put those things on show and said: ‘I wonder if they’ll go for this. I wonder what’s going to happen tomorrow morning,’ ’’ he said to Kimmelman in The New York Times. “I would understand that attitude perfectly, because the most interesting thing for an artist is to pick through the debris of a culture.”

ON DAMIEN HIRST

A painting produced collaboratively by Damien Hirst and David Bowie called 'Beautiful, halo, space-boy painting' 1995, part of the Bowie Collection on display at Sotheby's auction rooms. The painting is estimated at 250,000-350,000 pounds (318,000- 445,000 US dollars). AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

A painting produced collaboratively by Damien Hirst and David Bowie called ‘Beautiful, halo, space-boy painting’ 1995, part of the Bowie Collection on display at Sotheby’s auction rooms. The painting is estimated at 250,000-350,000 pounds (318,000- 445,000 US dollars). AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

Hirst was one of only a handful of high-profile contemporary artists for  whom Bowie publicly expressed his admiration, interviewing him for Modern Painters in 1995. “He’s different. I think his work is extremely emotional, subjective, very tied up with his own personal fears –  his fear of death is very strong – and I find his pieces moving and not at all flippant,” Bowie told Michael Kimmelman in an extensive 1998 interview in The New York Times.

ON JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT

A painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat called

A painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat called “Air Power’ 1984, estimated at 2.5-3.5 million pounds (3.18- 4.45 million US dollars), part of the Bowie Collection. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

“I feel the very moment of his brush or crayon touching the canvas,” wrote Bowie of Basquiat in a 1996 issue of Modern Painters. “There is a burning immediacy to his ever-evaporating decisions that fires the imagination ten or fifteen years on, as freshly molten as the day they were poured onto the canvas.” Bowie acquired Basquiat’s Air Power in 1997, the year after he played Andy Warhol to Jeffrey Wright’s Basquiat in Julian Schnabel’s 1996 biopic of the artist.

ON FRANK AUERBACH

“I find his kind of bas-relief way of painting extraordinary,” said Bowie of Auerbach in the 1998 New York Times interview with Kimmelman. “Sometimes I’m not really sure if I’m dealing with sculpture or painting.” Auerbach’s work provoked strong reactions: “It will give spiritual weight to my angst. Some mornings I’ll look at it and go, ‘Oh, God, yeah! I know!’ But that same painting, on a different day, can produce in me an incredible feeling of the triumph of trying to express myself as an artist. I can look at it and say: ‘My God, yeah! I want to sound like that looks.’”

From 1–10 November, the collection will be exhibited at Sotheby’s New Bond Street galleries in London, giving fans, collectors, art lovers and experts a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to immerse themselves in the extraordinary range of objects that informed Bowie’s private world. British artists, including high profile painters and sculptors such as Frank Auerbach and Henry Moore, make up the heart of the collection, representing over 200 pieces in total.

A gallery assistant poses with

A gallery assistant poses with “Chess Set” by Man Ray (est. £20,000-30,000) during the press preview of the “Bowie/Collector” auction at Sotheby’s. Leon Neal/Getty Images

Technicians prepare artworks from the Bowie Collection to go on display at Sotheby's. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

Technicians prepare artworks from the Bowie Collection to go on display at Sotheby’s. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

A photo of David Bowie on the auction labels of items during the press preview of the

A photo of David Bowie on the auction labels of items during the press preview of the “Bowie/Collector” auction at Sotheby’s. Leon Neal/Getty Images

What a great memento for those who appreciate Art & Bowie.  

I don’t know where I’m going from here but I promise it wont’ be boring – David Bowie

Source: sothebys.com

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