Lavender Farm

Do you know anyone who doesn’t love lavender?

Photo: d. king

Whether fresh, dried, scented in a candle, spray or body lotion or even in food…the scent is quite heavenly and soothing.

There was a time when I thought ok; enough with the lavender – it’s too common and it’s everywhere. But that only lasted for so long. Just can’t seem to stay away from it.  I have dried lavender bundles throughout my house in places that I know won’t keep the aroma for as long as I’d like (by a window for example) – but it looks so pretty and even though over time it starts to lose its potency, it’s one of those dried flowers where the scent seems to last for months on end.

I like using dried lavender as part of my special gift baskets and the essential oil for a calming facial spray.  I even use the oil in a spray bottle to spritz over my sheets and anywhere I want a fresh scent around home.

where do I go first?           Photo: d. king

Very recently when in the Okanagan Valley wine region of British Columbia, I came across a sign for Okanagan Herb Lavender Farm. 

This farm is a family business nestled in the hills of the Okanagan Valley on land where the family has farmed for four generations.  A place where they grow, harvest, dry and distill over 20 aromatic plants to make award-winning botanical products.

Their pure, small batch, unadulterated lavender essential oil is extracted in small batches through steam distillation of the Lavandula x. intermedia and Lavandula angustifolia plants  grown on the farm.  Their plants are 100% spray free and are harvested at their peak to ensure utmost quality.

SCORE!  I left with dried lavender bundles (for myself and for baskets) and a Lavender essential oil which I’m incorporating into the facial spray I make.  I wasn’t aware of the different types of lavender and their uses (being only familiar with English style) so they helped me choose the one to go best for my facial spray in orange blossom water and sweet orange essential oil (more on that later).

When storing lavender: commercially packaged dried lavender does not spoil, but it will start to lose potency over time.  Properly stored, dried lavender will generally stay at best quality for about 2 to 3 years. To maximize the shelf life of dried lavender purchased in bulk,  store in containers with tight-fitting lids.

Photo: d. king

Below taken from fignut.com

Important things to care about when storing lavender

  1. The most important thing to care about is that lavender is dry enough. It takes about 2 to 3 weeks to dry it properly. It is properly dry when the flowers and leaves are sharp and starts to fall off the stems. If you store it while still not dry, the moisture will cause a mold to develop which will destroy your flowers.
  1. Lavender should be stored in a dark place, away from the direct sunlight and away from the sources of any heath or humidity. It means the kitchen or living room are not good places to store it. The sunlight will fade its colors and possible humidity will make it go stale. So, keep it in a cool, dry, and dark location. If you don’t have a pantry, the dark corner of the corridor is a good place to store.
  1. It should be stored in airtight containers to preserve its fragrance. Otherwise, the fragrance will soon fade away.
    Photo: d. king

But hey; if that happens, just buy more!

https://www.okanaganlavender.com/

Sweet Almond Oil

What’s so sweet about Almond Oil you might ask?

The oil is a natural skincare superpower.  Almond oil, which is extracted from the popular tree nut, is known for its nourishing properties. The almond itself is small but mighty and referred to widely as “the king of nuts.” Aside from sweet almond oil, there’s also a bitter almond oil which is commonly used to provide scent and flavour.  Sweet almond oil is full of vitamin E, A, mono saturated fatty acids, protein, potassium and zinc.

Ancient Chinese and Ayurvedic practices have used almond oil for centuries to help soothe and soften the skin and to treat minor wounds and cuts. Today, it’s not uncommon to find almond oil in a wide variety of cosmetic and beauty products.

Healthy raw nuts still growing in the farmer’s orchard

It contains:

  • Vitamin A: The retinol in vitamin A has the ability to stimulate the production of new skin cells and smooth fine lines.
  • Vitamin E: This nutrient has antioxidant properties that may help prevent cell damage and help reduce ultraviolet (UV) damage to the skin.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids: These nutrients may help prevent premature aging and safeguard against sun damage.
  • Zinc: This is an essential nutrient for healing acne or other facial scars. However, it’s worth noting that zinc is more effective for this purpose when taken orally.

All in all, the nourishing nutrients and emollient properties this oil contains will help revive skin’s natural glow.

My product contains 100% pure certified organic cold pressed + UV protected virgin sweet almond oil. From Naka Platinum – made in Canada.  It’s Hexane-free meaning it does not use any such harmful chemicals during the extraction process and is free of all synthetic chemicals. 

Source for some info: healthline.com

Important: there’s one major caveat with this ingredient, regardless of skin type: Those with allergies to almonds or other tree nuts should avoid almond oil.

Jojoba Oil

Everyone has heard of jojoba oil and has probably tried it before as it’s well known and has been widely used in many skincare and hair products.  And there’s good reason for that.  Centuries before cosmetic companies starting including the benefits of jojoba oil in their formulations, Native Americans were using the oil from jojoba seeds to treat their skin wounds and sores.

Jojoba oil in transparent glass, fruits and natural leaves.

There’s plenty of evidence supporting the use of pure jojoba oil as a remedy for acne, dry skin, and countless other skin conditions.

However sometimes we don’t know where a plant originates or we forget about why the oil is good for us.

A bit about the plant:

The jojoba plant is a hearty, perennial plant that grows in North America and parts of Mexico. 

Not only does it thrive in the harsh, desert climates that could kill most living things, but it also produces a nut with many healing properties. The plant grows as a kind of shrub and produces large seeds that are harvested for their oil. The oil comes from a wax like substance within the seeds. Similar to the process of harvesting olive oil, jojoba oil requires the pressing of the seeds in order to extract the oil. 

It’s a sustainable plant, not considered to be endangered and the harvesting of the seed doesn’t require the death of the plant…so new land doesn’t need to be cleared for the planting of new jojoba plants.

jojoba tree

An interesting fact: Prior to jojoba oil’s wide acceptance in America, Americans were using sperm whale oil for cosmetic products and perfumes, and to lubricate machinery parts. But sperm whales were being hunted to extinction, and the U.S. banned the hunting of sperm whales in 1972 (thank goodness for that). That’s when it was discovered that jojoba oil was not only a substitute for sperm whale oil but that it was in fact superior to it. Not only does jojoba oil come from plants – it doesn’t require anything to be killed in order to obtain it for commercial use. (taken from herbal dynamics beauty).

Flawless skin starts with a flawless skincare routine

Benefits for skincare:

Like the other oils that make up the base for my deluxe face oil, this is also non-comedogenic so it will not clog pores. I use 100% pure jojoba from a source in California.

For centuries jojoba oil has been used for its healing properties on the skin. Whether it’s used to moisturize dry skin, treat oily skin, help minimize acne problems, heal wounds, or simply provide a defense against the natural aging process – jojoba oil is shown to work.

When you slather it on your face, jojoba oil mimics the skin’s sebum and balances out your complexion, adding more sebum where it’s needed, and winding down production where it’s not. 

And the oil is rich in iodine, which is shown to tackle harmful bacteria growth on the skin’s surface. 

When applied to the skin, it provides exceptional moisture balance and control, and unlike other oils or petroleum products, it is non-greasy. It is also an excellent and powerful moisturizing agent that leaves a non-oily feel on the skin’s surface. At the same time, it prevents water loss which gives a more supple feel to the skin.

The components of jojoba oil are tocopherols, which are compounds that are fat-soluble and have high antioxidant properties that are very important in helping to stabilize cell membranes. They’re high in vitamin E as well, which serves as an excellent antioxidant to fight free radicals, which damage skin and accelerate the aging process.

Taking care of your skin is more important than covering it up.

VIFF: Bones of Crows

We cannot go back in time; we can only move forward and learn from our past for a brighter tomorrow.

After world premiering at TIFF earlier this month, Marie Clements’ poignant film “Bones of Crows” opened the Vancouver International Film Festival last night as the perfect lead-in for Truth and Reconciliation.  The director and most of the cast and crew members were in attendance.

Grace Dove as Aline Spears in “Bones of Crows”

In Canada, every September 30th now marks the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation which honours the children who never returned home and Survivors of residential schools, as well as their families and communities. Public commemoration of the tragic and painful history and ongoing impacts of residential schools is a vital component of the reconciliation process.

Orange Shirt Day which also falls on September 30th, is an Indigenous-led grassroots commemorative day intended to raise awareness of the individual, family and community inter-generational impacts of residential schools, and to promote the concept of “Every Child Matters”.  The orange shirt is a symbol of the stripping away of culture, freedom and self-esteem experienced by Indigenous children over generations.

Bones of Crows

The message in this commanding film which was written, produced and directed by Marie Clements; a Canadian Métis playwright, performer, director, producer and screenwriter (founding artistic director of Urban Ink Productions) was powerful and not to be overlooked.

Inspired by true events, Bones of Crows tells the life story of a Cree woman named Aline Spears (strikingly performed by Canadian actor Grace Dove) through varying stages of her life.  From a child taken from her parents to an 85 year of woman who confronts a former abuser from the church.  A line that stuck with me from the film is “parents don’t always know what is best for their children – that’s why we should leave it up to the government and the church.”  REALLY???

The film is intended to be disconcerting and that, it is.  It is a must-see for all so that we may learn from the past so we can move forward mindfully

Here is further description taken from the VIFF Programme:

VIFF 2022 Opening Film

In these troubled and lopsided times, we need our storytellers to help us understand our inheritance, be it pain or privilege, and to lay the intellectual and emotional groundwork not only for reconciliation, but for reparation and restoration. Vancouver-born Dene/Métis writer-director Marie Clements (whose previous films The Road Forward and Red Snow have been part of VIFF’s year-round and festival programming) squares up to the challenge with this bold, necessarily harrowing tale of oppression and resilience which spans the greater part of the 20th century.

Aline Spears (played at different ages by Grace Dove, Summer Testawich, and Carla Rae) is a happy, gifted child, until she and her siblings are removed to a residential school. The scars of that experience will run deep through the remainder of their days, though it will not be the only time that official government policy will act as an instrument of abuse and trauma. Despite this, Aline enlists in WWII, where, ironically, her fluency in Cree becomes a national asset. The reward for her service is yet more anguish and struggle.

This is a tough film, but it has epic ambition, deep-rooted conviction, anger, and urgency. Clements is not afraid to make provocative and important connections, and she marshals an outstanding cast of Indigenous actors with care and compassion.

This program contains scenes that may distress some viewers, especially those who have experienced harm, abuse, violence, and/or intergenerational trauma due to colonial practices.

Support is available 24 hours a day for anyone affected by their experience at residential schools and for those who may be triggered by content dealing with residential schools, child abuse, emotional trauma, and racism. The national Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line is available at 1-866-925-4419.

About VIFF | viff.org

Founded in 1982, the Greater Vancouver International Film Festival Society is a not-for-profit cultural society and federally registered charitable organization that operates the internationally acclaimed Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF) and the year-round programming at the VIFF Centre. VIFF produces screenings, talks, conferences and events that act as a catalyst for the community to discover the creativity and craft of storytelling on screen.

Argan Oil – Liquid Gold

Getting back to basics I want to talk about Argan Oil.  This oil is one of the fab four ingredients that make up the base for my new face oil and a long standing natural remedy in Morocco.  The oil is produced from the Argan tree which is actually one of the oldest trees on our planet.

The Berber tribe of Morocco refer to the Argan tree as the Tree of Life.  They’re very familiar with the benefits as the Berber women have been using the oil in folk medicine for centuries to treat skin conditions, rheumatism and heart disease. 

These days, the demand for Argan oil which is often referred to as the “liquid gold of Morocco” is very high. Ever since the word about the wonderful benefits that the oil gives to the skin, hair and nails reached the West, the cosmetic world clamoured for this oil.

Argan Oil is native to southwest Morocco and the seeds are cold-pressed from the deciduous argan tree fruit (Argania spinosa).  Photo below.

The fruit is peeled away and the seeds are dried, roasted, and pressed to extract the oil. The final result is a smooth, delicious oil that’s become popular around the world for its flavour and health benefits. It’s also known as one of the rarest culinary oils in the world. Wild plants are used across the world in a variety of beneficial ways, present in the food we eat, medicines we take and cosmetic products. 

For cosmetic purposes, the Argan oil I use is 100% pure with a nice amber colour. 

Here are some of the benefits for applying to the face:

Argan oil is rich in natural vitamins, essential fats and antioxidants that help moisturize skin.  

The oil provides a major boost of hydration to the skin, thanks to its high quantities of vitamin E which helps strengthen the skin’s barrier so it’s able to retain more hydration.  It has also been found to improve skin elasticity and brighten your skintone.  It has anti-sebum effects, which can effectively regulate amounts of sebum on the skin. This can help to treat several different types of acne and promote a smoother, calmer complexion. 

You can always add a few drops to your regular moisturizer too.

Sidenote: It’s all good except for the part about the possibility of the tree now being considered an endangered species. After the first sales in the US of the cosmetic product in 2003 (not that long ago), demand soared and production increased. In 2012 the Moroccan government planned for increased production, then around 2,500 tonnes, to 4,000 tonnes by 2020.

When I run out of the big bottle that was brought back for me from Morocco (certified organic by ecocert and stored in a cool, dark place) I may not be able to buy more.  

Have you tried this oil?

 

 

 

Bring Back Better Baking

It’s simple

Bliss Bakery; Peachland, Okanagan, B.C.          Photo: d. king

“Imagine a world where the craftsmanship of the baker, the fragility of our planet, the integrity of the organic farmer, the strength of community and the simplicity of real food are valued and nourished.” – True Grain Vision (True Grain Bakehouse; Summerland).

The Art of Artisan baking gets resurrected with three outstanding places I recently visited on my B.C. road trip to the Okanagan and Kootenays.  Granted; the main focus was on visiting wineries and friends, however we can never overlook a good burger, sandwich or cinnamon bun.  And cookies!  And Brownies!

True Grain Bakehouse; Summerland, Okanagan, B.C. Photo: d. king

As Bliss Bakery says: “many people are unaware that so many bakeries today do not make their own products; rather they bring in mixes or sometimes even fully baked items and present it as their own – have you ever wondered why those Nanaimo Bars look so similar at all the different bakeries you go to?

Staying True to the Grain:  True Grain Bakehouse uses 100 % BC-farmed organic grain which they stone mill for everything. From ancient & heritage grains like Einkorn, Emmer, Rye, Khorasan and Spelt, to heritage wheat like Canada’s own Red Fife, they buy direct from organic farmers close to home.

Photo: d. king

“Each day our talented bakers make hundreds of loaves and pastries by hand, using tried and tested European-inspired recipes.  We don’t skimp on quality, and we never cut corners. The result is bread that is wholesome, full of flavour, and is simply a joy to eat.”

I wasn’t planning on this but a woman in front of me convinced me to buy a package.  I mean, if you’re going to indulge… make it worthwhile.  Photo: d. king

Amazing Grains.  Photo: d. king

Greener Pastures and a Community Lifestyle in Chilliwack, B.C.

The Yellow Deli was orginally started in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1973 and spread out to other countries.  This place is not a 9-to-5 job for the people who work here. This is a true “group effort” as everyone lives and works together. They live communally on a nearby farm where all the food served at The Yellow Deli is from.  Everything is so fresh and delicious.

From Farm to Tableliterally. This is a place you don’t want to miss if you’re passing through Chilliwack whether it’s for a bowl of soup, sandwich or a salad. Photo: d. king

Taken from the website: their group is a part of the-first-century-church which in essence lives in the pattern of the original church of Jerusalem 30 AD.  They are going back to the way it was originally. They hope to see many things that have gone off course be restored to the “way it was supposed to be.” 

“Obviously our hope for this world goes far beyond what politicians are promising these days, but we have high hopes and we believe we’ll see them fulfilled.”

So as you can see, there’s a lot more to the Yellow Deli than a great looking sandwich. But if you want one, they have it!

Bristol Bay Sandwich

I had the veggie burger which was the best tasting ever (with Chilliwack corn as part of what was in it).  Paul took out a cinnamon bun to which I had a bite and made sure to get one on the way back.  

Do you have a special bakery where you live?

Bliss Bakery; Peachland. Photo: d. king

https://yellowdeli.com/

https://www.truegrainbakehouse.ca/

https://www.blissbakery.ca/

 

 

Coconut Oil

The Coconut tree is called the “Tree of Life” because all the parts of the entire tree–from top to bottom–are used to sustain human life.Inside the shell lies the meat and coconut water, so it must be the most useful tree in the world.  It’s definitely the most resilient. Coconut trees are found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world where even in conditions with very little nourishment they flourish, growing taller than most of the plants around it.  Which brings me to…

Oil around the world, women for centuries have incorporated natural oils such as coconut into their skincare routine. While it won’t make you grow taller it will make your skin feel wonderful, which at least will help elevate your mood. And that’s a tall order in itself.

After having tested numerous beauty products myself,  I decided to go back to making and selling a few of my own.  Even in a competitive market.  Four of these oils make up the base to my deluxe facial oil (to which I then add other essential oils). Since essential oils are highly concentrated, a carrier oil (I refer to it as a base) is needed for dilution, efficacy and ease of application.

For full disclusure, I’m going to give a bit of background on each of what I put in there starting with Coconut Oil in its fractionated form.

Photo taken from artnaturals

Coconut Oil for Face:

Fractionated coconut oil (or virgin coconut oil) in this form is distilled down to its fattiest acids. The distilling process makes fractionated coconut the perfect addition to your beauty routine.  Coconut oil in all its forms is excellent for skin but when mixing with other oils (including essential oils) the fractionated form is best.

Fractionated coconut oil is tasteless, odorless, and usually more expensive than regular coconut oil. It is produced through hydrolysis and steam distillation. It’s important to note that no added products or chemicals are incorporated into the mixture during this time, so fractionated coconut oil remains a natural product. Significantly, it includes medium-chain triglycerides. Therefore, it has a protracted shelf existence.

Coconut oil itself is chemically composed of two types of fatty acids: long-chain fatty acids and medium-chain fatty acids. With fractionated coconut oil, the two key fatty acids are separated, leaving you mostly with the medium-chain fatty acids.

Regular coconut oil only becomes liquid under high temperatures (78 degrees F) and has a greasy feel. Because of this unique difference, fractionated coconut oil is best used for therapeutic purposes. Regular coconut oil, on the other hand, is solid at cool or room temperature, but liquid when heated. Because it has such a high concentration of saturated fat, fractionated coconut oil is much more stable than regular coconut oil.

What does it do? It helps smooth skin and works as an antioxidant. It also binds other ingredients together, and can work as a preservative of sorts to make the active ingredients in skincare last longer as a more natural alternative to other synthetic chemicals found in many topical skin products.

In case you’re wondering about my background in all of this…

I don’t have one.  KiddingI’ve always taken an interest in skincare and over time have sampled many, many products.  Other than through sheer trial and error, as a side interest I trained and graduated from George Brown College – School of Makeup and Esthetics when I lived in Toronto. Even though I’ve never worked as an esthetician I have (had in some cases) gained some knowledge.  I made beautiful face and body products from scratch. I’ve never had fillers or botox or anything other than regular facials. That’s not to say I could not use some work (ha!) it’s just that I’ve not done so. At least so far. Never say never.

I’ll continue to go through my list of ingredients with some background about them..because if you’re interested in purchasing something you should know what’s in them beforehand.

Remember it’s better to create something and be criticized than to create nothing and criticize others.” – Ricky Gervais

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biodynamic

Maybe it’s because I’m a wine lover

or maybe it’s because I’m going back to the Okanagan this week, but I wanted to check on the meaning behind some of the organic wine farming terminology.  And I thought you might want to know too.

We’re all familiar with organic and how farming without pesticides is much healthier for everyone, with a very meaningful benefit to the environment.

Biodiversity plays a key role in organic farming and we’re hearing the word “Biodynamic” a lot…but what is it?

For our friends at Summerhill/Pyramid winery in Kelowna, these organic + biodynamic practices have been standard and an integral part of wine making since it was purchased by the Cipes family in 1986.

There’s always a riesling for everything! But hey; I’m not even a huge reisling fan and this is my favourite. Not too sweet with just the right balance. An off-dry experience of lemon-lime, peach and green apple.

Shared from their newsletter:

Biodynamic Farming Considered the grandfather to organics, was introduced by Rudolf Steiner in 1924. This concept encouraged a more holistic approach to agriculture, prioritizing sustainable soil health and encouraging biodiversity. By balancing the interrelationship of soil, plants, and animals, we create a closed system where nothing is wasted. Summerhill was certified by Demeter International in 2012 and remains British Columbia’s only certified biodynamic vineyard.

Taken from Summerhill/Pyramid website

At the core of biodynamic farming is living in harmony with nature, harvesting soulful, beautiful food and returning nutrient back to the earth.

Biodiversity plays a key role in organic farming.  Since we don’t use any synthetics in our vineyards, we must encourage nature to fill ecological niches and maintain balance.  By allowing flowering plants to grow between the rows, we provide a home for beneficial insects such as ladybugs and praying mantises.  The natural flora also help to improve our soil life and water retention, important elements to growing quality grapes! 

Anthony Gismondi on wine gave this 90 points. He has this to say: Muscat is not for everyone, but it can be alluring when it’s as right as this one. Fragrant and floral from jasmine to orange blossoms, this wine brings it all to the table. I tried it and totally agree.

Our home vineyard is 17 hectares where natural springs emerge on the property, and join with creeks to create a beautiful wetland nature sanctuary that supports a variety of species.

Summerhill is committed to producing 100% organic wine.  Our Kelowna vineyard entered the certification program in 1988, and has received Demeter Biodynamic certification in 2012. In addition, our winemaking is also certified organic, allowing us to display the Canadian certified organic logo on our bottles, ensuring you can expect a high level of quality and purity.

Sidenote from Girl who would be King: might I add that their wine tastes better and doesn’t give you a headache (unless of course you really over indulge but that’s not what I’m talking about).  That’s not to say that I drink “only organic”  (although it is my preference to do so), however there is unfortunately not enough “all organic” wineries so I do try other wines and like many of them.  My only hope is that all wineries follow suit and go the Summerhill route to a healthier way of living/drinking.

Cheers to a good week ahead!

 

The power of Film

It’s that time of year again. The time where movie theaters start to fill up as Fall approaches.  And of course; the film festivals start up.  Toronto International Film Festival (better known as TIFF) is on now until the 18th followed by the Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF for short) which begins on September 29th

Film is a powerful tool for so many reasons.  There’s times I don’t want to think and only want to laugh, however; the three highlighted here help to get a message across with a not so gentle reminder of what good and bad we humans are capable of.  This is the true power of film. Comedy and Tragedy, like life itself. Previews of what’s to come…

If you liked My Octopus Teacher…

Blueback

Blueback: photo + description taken from TIFF website

A story about an intimate mother–daughter relationship, forged by the women’s keen desire to protect the inhabitants of the pristine blue oceans on the Australian coast where they live.

With images of beautiful blue vistas demanding to be seen on the big screen, Robert Connolly (Balibo, TIFF ’09; Paper Planes, TIFF ’14) returns to the Festival with a story about a young woman’s connection to the ocean and an inherited mission of environmental advocacy.

A teenager named Abby and her mom maintains a bond with a groper fish (In Australia, “groper” is used instead of “grouper” ) affectionately named Blueback, who becomes a reminder of all the wonders the ocean has to offer and a path to healing a rift between Abby and her mother.

Sidenote from Girl who would be King: as a former scuba diver where at 19, my very first dive was in the Bahamas with a team from National Geographic no less,  I personally came into contact with Grouper fish among sea turtles and many other remarkable sea creatures.  I visited Cayman Islands too where turtle stew is considered the national dish. This trailer pulled on my heartstrings.  

Grouper and snapper are still the mainstays in the Bahamas, however, with the former being the “Rolls Royce of fish” according to Ben Simmons, owner and operator of Harbour Island’s Ocean View Club.

Bones of Crows

Bones of Crows: photo + description taken from VIFF website.

An epic account of the life of Cree matriarch Aline Spears that spans generations, Marie Clements’ Bones of Crows is a powerful indictment of the abuse of Indigenous peoples as well as a stirring story of resilience and resistance.

752 Is Not A Number

752 is Not a Number: photo + description taken from TIFF website.

On January 8, 2020, Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 went down as it was leaving Iranian air space. All 176 people on board were killed, many of them Iranian Canadians. For weeks Iranian authorities vociferously denied responsibility, but foreign governments and agencies were certain the plane was shot down by Iranian military, a fact Iran’s government eventually admitted. There were no answers as to why the plane was fired on or even why it was allowed to take off, since hostilities had broken out in the region in preceding days.

This tragedy is the subject of the documentary. The focus is one man’s dogged fight for the truth. Hamed Esmaeilion, a dentist in Newmarket, Ontario, lost his wife and his young daughter in the incident. Determined not to let the Iranian government exploit their memories, Hamed took a harrowing journey to Iran to claim the remains, then embarked on a quest for justice for all the victims in this atrocity.

Happy Film Going (and some not so happy film going) but we all learn something and become more mindful in the process.

Have a great weekend (a long weekend in most provinces in Canada due to the passing of Queen Elizabeth II).  RIP our longest reigning monarch.

 

Bioéthique

Ahhh the luxury of a good facial. What woman doesn’t love that afterglow?

I just found my new go-to in an invitingly clean and calming place.

Taken from the outside – which made me want to go inside. Photo: d. king

I just experienced a super deluxe facial with aesthetician Deborah at Bioéthique Spa in Vancouver.  Not to mention a long overdue one as well.  So it was tiiiiiime!  Relaxing, pampering, the massage followed by seaweed mask was amazing and I was treated to a shoulder and arm massage too.  Divine!  I highly recommend this place.

Bioéthique is ranked one of the top ten spas in BC.  I did the 60 minute facial with an extra partial *microdermabrasion and LED treatment to help strengthen elastin and smooth skin. When I left my skin looked and felt radiant.  I loved the delicious vegan chocolate too.

Bonus: it’s dog friendly too.   Photo: d. king

Their products are made with the highest quality ingredients which nurture and repair the skin for true skin rejuvenation.  Using a high concentration of active properties and selected botanical ingredients, they help penetrate the skin for a multitude of purposes – depending on your skin type.  They help to visibly firm, tone and restore a gorgeous complexion.

Photo: d, king

Bioéthique‘s exquisite skin care line is entirely vegan, 100% natural, minimum 98% certified organic and contains no synthetic chemicals or GMO’s.   Embraced by both men and women, the high concentration and active properties of each selected botanical ingredient penetrates deeply into the skin – visibly restoring a gorgeous glow.

Photo: d. king

How often is too often?  I guess it depends on your skin and of course, your budget.  There are women who come in weekly but for most it’s every few months or at least seasonal.  I think for me it will be seasonal, especially from now on.

*Microdermabrasion treatments use a minimally abrasive instrument to gently sand your skin, removing the thicker, uneven outer layer, and has many benefits. This type of skin rejuvenation is used to treat light scarring, discoloration, sun damage and stretch marks.  The effects of the treatment typically last for about one month. The length of time results will last varies depending on age and how well you respond to the treatment.

Photo taken from website
Photo taken from website

To book: