How ART influences FASHION

And it’s such a drip….figuratively speaking, because I’m talking about Jackson Pollock in this post.

Photographed by Cecil Beaton, Vogue, March 1951

Photographed by Cecil Beaton, Vogue, March 1951

 A survey of Pollock’s works is at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) covering early experiments with primal themes and loosely figurative forms from the years 1934 to 1954.  The exhibition also features the highly recognizable drip paintings which made him famous the world over.

These drippings have caught on with fashion designers big time who have been inspired by them and have incorporated Pollock-print paint splatterings on everything from sneakers to ball gowns.

While designers have referenced many artists over the years, there are few so synonymous with Pollock’s style.

Maison Margiela’s popular “Pollock” sneaker Photo: Courtesy of Maison Margiela

Maison Margiela’s popular “Pollock” sneaker
Photo: Courtesy of Maison Margiela

Perhaps the first fashion world adoption of Pollock’s art came in a 1951 issue of Vogue (in photo above), where a model showed off the season’s chicest gowns standing in front of a Pollock painting on view at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

Since then, his signature splashes have infiltrated the runways in many forms. The most unmatched tribute to Pollock’s art, however, came courtesy of Alexander McQueen, who positioned model Shalom Harlow in the center of paint-shooting robots that streaked her ivory gown black and acid green as she rotated on a platform.

Alexander McQueen Spring 1999 Photo: Courtesy of Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen Spring 1999
Photo: Courtesy of Alexander McQueen

Now that’s making a statement!

“Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934-1954” is on view at the Museum of Modern Art until Sunday, May 1, 2016.

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