Style: Hubert de Givenchy

His are the only clothes in which I am myself,” Hepburn once said of Givenchy,

Givenchy designed outfits for many of Hepburn’s films, like this strapless, floral gown in 1954’s “Sabrina.”

according to Vogue. “He is far more than a couturier, he is a creator of personality.”

Audrey Hepburn, as the designer’s muse, accompanied him in inventing a style that would redefine standards of beauty.

The House of Givenchy is sad to report the passing of its founder Hubert de Givenchy  at the age of 91 (February 21, 1927 – March 10, 2018), a major personality of the world of French Haute Couture and a gentleman who symbolized Parisian chic and elegance for more than half a century.  He will be greatly missed.



Hubert de Givenchy founded his namesake fashion house in 1952. No sooner did it open than it earned a reputation for breaking with fashion codes of its time. After an incredibly successful 40 years career he would be succeeded by some of fashion’s great talents that contributed to the house of Givenchy ongoing story.

Hepburn’s Givenchy gown at the 1954 Academy Awards is still one of the most memorable Oscars dresses of all time. NBC/Getty Images

Hubert James Taffin de Givenchy founded his namesake House in 1952. That same year, he presented a collection that would leave an indelible mark on fashion history: his “separates” – elegant blouses and light skirts blending architectural lines and simplicity – met with enormous success in light of the more constricted looks of the day.

He also dressed the likes of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Grace Kelly and many other famous and non-famous women.  The most memorable fashion moment maybe:  Audrey Hepburn’s little black dress, in the movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”.

The NY Times referred to him as the Fashion Pillar of Romantic Elegance.

Enough Said!


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