Sunday Supplement: Magnificent Magnesium

My main purpose in adding this health section to my site was brought on by the Coronavirus. I took an interest in researching whatever extra protection might prevent me and those I care about from getting a serious case of Covid.  I’ve been learning a lot in the process and realize that there are many components to overall health.  Having said this, I’m not a fanatic in any sense about taking high dosages of just anything and everything I see on the shelves.  I’m only sharing what I deem to be the most important missing pieces of a complicated puzzle.  Of course, our bodies are very complex propositions, but what I know for sure is what you know too – those of us with a weakened immune system are the first to get knocked down.  I started with Vitamin D last week. Now let’s check out several more Covid Combatants starting with…

Foods containing natural magnesium. Chocolate, banana, cocoa, nuts, avocados, broccoli, almonds.

MAGNESIUM may be the MOST important mineral/electrolyte in the body.  Indeed, if you were forced to only take one nutritional supplement, Magnesium would likely be your best bet. That’s because no other single nutrient plays as many roles as Magnesium as it’s essential to 300+ (some claim the numbers to be much higher) enzymatic reactions.

(Health Secrets) After oxygen, water, and basic food, magnesium may be one of the most important elements needed by our bodies.  It is vital for heart health, bone health, mental function and overall body maintenance.

Magnesium is more important than calcium, potassium or sodium, and it regulates all three of them. Contrary to popular misconceptions, it is magnesium that is actually most important in building strong bones and preventing bone loss. Recent research has revealed that lack of this mineral may put your heart and your overall health at significant risk.  This research also found that a deficiency may be linked to cognitive dysfunction and mental decline.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of magnesium for adults is 420 milligrams (mg) per day. Yet that’s an average amount since it depends on a number of other factors such as one’s body weight, level of physical activity and the amount of sugar one consumes. Generally speaking, the heavier you are, the more active you are, and the more sugar you consume, the more your body needs on a daily basis.

So what are the best food sources of Magnesium? High-fiber foods such as dark green leafy vegetables, unrefined grains, nuts and beans. Yet since so many North American diets are lacking in this regard, it should come as no surprise that most diets are 40-80% deficient.  Most people can get enough magnesium by eating the right foods but If you’re concerned about low magnesium, ask your doctor for a blood test, preferably an RBC (red blood cell) magnesium test.

*Magnesium is needed for many cellular metabolism tasks. It’s involved in more than 300 chemical reactions in the body. Muscles need this mineral to contract; nerves need it to send and receive messages. It keeps your heart beating steadily and your immune system strong.

However, low magnesium intake is relatively common.

It’s primarily found in people who follow a typical Western diet, one containing lots of processed foods and refined grains while lacking in leafy green vegetables and legumes, which provide magnesium and other important nutrients.

**The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for magnesium for adults is 310–420 mg depending on age and gender.

I eat exceptionally well and supplement with an additional 300 (sometimes less) mg of  Magnesium Citrate daily.

But every individual is different. The table below shows the recommended daily allowance (RDA) or adequate intake (AI) of magnesium for adults, infants, and children.

Age Male Female
Birth to 6 months (AI) 30 mg 30 mg
7–12 months (AI) 75 mg 75 mg
1–3 years (RDA) 80 mg 80 mg
4–8 years (RDA) 130 mg 130 mg
9–13 years (RDA) 240 mg 240 mg
14–18 years (RDA) 410 mg 360 mg
19–30 years (RDA) 400 mg 310 mg
31–50 years (RDA) 420 mg 320 mg
51+ years (RDA) 420 mg 320 mg
Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency:
The symptoms of magnesium deficiency are usually subtle unless your levels become severely low.  If you believe you may have a magnesium deficiency, your suspicions can be confirmed with a simple blood test.
You may have a deficiency if you feel the following…
Muscle spasms, cramps or pain, fatigue, high blood pressure, insomnia, anxiety, headaches, heart arrhythmia, osteoporosis, nausea, weakness, decreased appetite.
  • As magnesium deficiency worsens, symptoms may include: numbness and tingling.

Here’s an excellent book on the subject written by a medical doctor and researcher who is considered to be the world’s leading expert on the actions and uses of this vital mineral.

Source:

*Harvard Medical:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/what-you-should-know-about-magnesium2

** Healthline.com (for different types of Magnesium Supplements):

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/magnesium-dosage#recommendations-by-age

 

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