Argan Oil – Liquid Gold

Getting back to basics I want to talk about Argan Oil.  This oil is one of the fab four ingredients that make up the base for my new face oil and a long standing natural remedy in Morocco.  The oil is produced from the Argan tree which is actually one of the oldest trees on our planet.

The Berber tribe of Morocco refer to the Argan tree as the Tree of Life.  They’re very familiar with the benefits as the Berber women have been using the oil in folk medicine for centuries to treat skin conditions, rheumatism and heart disease. 

These days, the demand for Argan oil which is often referred to as the “liquid gold of Morocco” is very high. Ever since the word about the wonderful benefits that the oil gives to the skin, hair and nails reached the West, the cosmetic world clamoured for this oil.

Argan Oil is native to southwest Morocco and the seeds are cold-pressed from the deciduous argan tree fruit (Argania spinosa).  Photo below.

The fruit is peeled away and the seeds are dried, roasted, and pressed to extract the oil. The final result is a smooth, delicious oil that’s become popular around the world for its flavour and health benefits. It’s also known as one of the rarest culinary oils in the world. Wild plants are used across the world in a variety of beneficial ways, present in the food we eat, medicines we take and cosmetic products. 

For cosmetic purposes, the Argan oil I use is 100% pure with a nice amber colour. 

Here are some of the benefits for applying to the face:

Argan oil is rich in natural vitamins, essential fats and antioxidants that help moisturize skin.  

The oil provides a major boost of hydration to the skin, thanks to its high quantities of vitamin E which helps strengthen the skin’s barrier so it’s able to retain more hydration.  It has also been found to improve skin elasticity and brighten your skintone.  It has anti-sebum effects, which can effectively regulate amounts of sebum on the skin. This can help to treat several different types of acne and promote a smoother, calmer complexion. 

You can always add a few drops to your regular moisturizer too.

Sidenote: It’s all good except for the part about the possibility of the tree now being considered an endangered species. After the first sales in the US of the cosmetic product in 2003 (not that long ago), demand soared and production increased. In 2012 the Moroccan government planned for increased production, then around 2,500 tonnes, to 4,000 tonnes by 2020.

When I run out of the big bottle that was brought back for me from Morocco (certified organic by ecocert and stored in a cool, dark place) I may not be able to buy more.  

Have you tried this oil?

 

 

 

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