B Well – the health perks of bonding

I just picked up this book but I was sure it said “bondage.”

Daily Interactions with others – are they just as important to your health as eating well or going for a run?toasting

In her new book, Love 2.0: How Our Supreme Emotion Affects Everything We Feel, Think, Do, and Become, Barbara Fredrickson, Ph.D, suggests that true love isn’t about romance, companionship, or fondness; fundamentally it springs from something else she calls “micromoments of shared positive emotion.”  That the more loving you are in everyday life the healthier you could be.  She believes that such moments have the potential to lower our risk for disease and may even influence how our cells regenerate.

From the body’s point of view: when the brain registers love, it triggers the release of the hormone and neurotransmitter oxytocin.  Your emotions can trigger hormones that influence the way genes are expressed in the body.   We know this happens with negative emotions: stress releases adrenaline, which can prime cells for inflammation, causing disease.  She believes that positive feelings, which can trigger the release of oxytocin, have the opposite effect and set us up for a healthier life.  Makes perfect sense.

Simply get out and be more social.  Getting the benefits of love doesn’t require being in a romantic relationship or living near family or friends.  Just make sure you’re connecting with others, whether it’s through conversation or eye contact.  We tend to trivialize these interactions, but they’re important to our overall well being.

Or, get a rescue dog that you love and they’ll love you back tenfoldJia Jia