Personally speaking, what could be better than combining Art with Fashion?

making the best impression
making the best impression

Moving forward as we look back

Combining art & fashion with ‘Dior Impressions’ – a new design book about the ‘Master.’

Another fabulous coffee table book.  Whether cut with ballooning bustles or embroidered with a multitude of chiffon petals, Christian Dior’s dresses evoked the light, color and fluidity in the work of the French Impressionists.  And it wasn’t by chance.  A lover of both art and flowers, Dior found tremendous inspiration in the plein air paintings of Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.  ‘Dior (Rizzoli), a new book published to accompany an exhibition at the Musee Christian Dior in Granville, France, explores the 19th-century art movement’s role in shaping the fashion house – from Dior’s very first designs to a Raf Simons (the current designer) 2012 couture gown, the pastel colors of which recall a Monet canvas.  K.N. for W Magazine.

Natalie Portman models for Dior
Natalie Portman models for Dior

A little bit of fashion history: “The future has arrived and it’s all about dreaming of the past” the essayist and novelist Kurt Anderson once wrote.  This was true of the 2013 Fall shows.  Ideas from decades old collections showed up on the runways and felt entirely au courant.  This was particularly central to Raf Simon’s second ready-to-wear collection for Dior.  With a passion for art similar to Monsieur Dior, Simons embroidered early Warhol fashion illustrations onto dresses and embossed them onto clutches.

Charlize Theron wears Dior
Charlize Theron wears Dior

It doesn’t take a student of fashion history to understand the allure of a coquettishly punk cocktail number, nipped in at the waist in the most feminine, flattering way.  Fashion’s tendency to sample and recycle is certainly nothing new.  So, when it comes to reinterpreting sartorial history, Simons says “it’s important to think of fashion as part of life. The past can inform, but nostalgia should not be a part of it.

Taken from an article written by Karin Nelson – This Old Thing?

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