Fish in Season – Fast & Fresh

For when you desire a light, easy to digest delicious dinner, try making something with fresh white fish like Halibut or Dover Sole.halibut3

Both mild fish adapt really well to almost any seasoning, even something so simple and classic like butter, garlic, squeezed lemon & parsley.  It’s no fuss and fairly fast to make. Sole is not a dense fish so it tends to fall apart quite easily. For me the best way to cook sole is quickly in a frypan with a light breading and a little butter. I mix panko breadcrumbs with fresh grated parmesan and add spices like Italian seasoning then squeeze fresh lemon juice over top.  A little chopped red chili pepper adds an extra kick. 

Super Sole Sunday.  Panfried with a light homemade breading over sea asparagus (sautéed in a little butter by itself).  Sides of steamed farmers market carrots and wild rice.

Super Sole Sunday!  Pan fried with a light homemade breading over sea asparagus
(sautéed in a little butter by itself).  Sides: steamed  carrots and wild rice.

Halibut can be steamed, baked or broiled but never fried.  Okay, I’ve never tried frying it. I just don’t think it would lend itself well to the frypan.

This time I placed Halibut fillets over fresh Kale in a cast iron pan and baked it with sundried tomatoes and lemon olive oil over top.  It came out moist and the kale had some crispiness – a nice combo with corn on the cob and steamed tri-coloured carrots.

Halibut over Kale with Sundried Tomatoes

Halibut over Kale with Sundried Tomatoes

We’re repeatedly told to eat two fish meals per week. Fish offers a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals, low in cholesterol-raising saturated fat. Don’t forget we get major sources of two of the essential omega-3 fatty acids. But some fish contain higher levels than others.

Did you know?

Even though sole is not usually found at the top of the list, it turns out to be a good source, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It’s also packed with protein, vitamin B-12 and vitamin D. It’s also much lower in fat. Along with the omega-3s, one serving of sole only has 73 calories yet supplies 13 grams of protein, 20 percent of your RDA of vitamin D and 41 percent of your RDA for vitamin B-12.

Halibut does not have the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the seafood world, but it is still a good choice, containing .9 g per 100 g of fresh fish. This compares with fresh salmon at 1.4 g per 100 g of fish; lake trout, with 1.6 g; sardines, with 1.7 g; herring, with 1.7 g; and mackerel, with 2.2 g, according to weight-loss adviser Anne Collins from LiveStrong.

*Sidenote: I have one helluva Halibut story.  Our VW camper broke down in a tiny fishing village in Newfoundland on a Friday night moments after buying a fresh huge (emphasis on one big f…..fish) halibut right off a boat.  We ended up having to spend the whole weekend in a motel that luckily had a kitchenette while waiting for a part to arrive on Monday and with me having to cook halibut every which way for several days.  I’m surprised I can still eat it.  Add to the misery the closest walking distance store from the hotel was a Walmart.  That was the first time I set foot in one of those.  They really do have a lot of stuff.  Moving along right…. I have bigger fish to fry.

What is your favourite fish to make? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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